Wednesday, 22 October 2014

Eating Seafood During Pregnancy Tops UN Panel Recommendation

The Committee on World Food Security, meeting in Rome last week for its forty-first session, has made “Encourage[ing] Eating Seafood especially by pregnant and breastfeeding women, children…” a key recommendation in its report (attached). The group of renowned world food and nutrition experts was created in 1974 as a forum for review of nutrition and food security policies.

This recommendation is in line with the very latest in nutrition science,” said Rima Kleiner MS, RD, Registered Dietitian for the National Fisheries Institute. “And while what the group says is important, where it’s said is also worth noting. Read more...


International conference tackles harmful algae threats

The world’s experts in harmful algal blooms and marine biotoxins will descend on Wellington next week for the 16th International Conference on Harmful Algae (ICHA), hosted this year by Cawthron Institute.

Around 500 world-leading scientists and representatives from government agencies, the seafood and aquaculture industries, and environmental organisations are expected to attend the biennial conference on 27 to 31 October. Find out more: Go to the conference website (www.icha2014nz.com)  or read the full programme. Read more...


BP takes another shot in bid to delay seafood claims payments

BP has asked a federal judge to delay a second round of oil spill payments to seafood workers, arguing that there are still problems within the compensation program.

In a Monday (October 20) filing in US District Court in New Orleans, the British oil giant said “at some point” there should be a second round of up to US$500 (€393.887) million in payments to workers hurt by the spill. But the company said those payments cannot start now. Read more...

Regional plans adopted as landing obligation nears

The European Commission has adopted a series of discard plans as it gears up for the introduction of an obligation to land all catches on January 1, 2015.

Discarding, the practice of returning unwanted fish back into the sea, is banned by the new Common Fisheries Policy (CFP) which stipulates that fishermen will instead have to land everything that they catch. The five discard plans adopted contain some practical rules, as well as a limited number of exemptions, to help fishermen implement the new rules. Read more...


Innovative aquaculture program grows oysters

A seafood dealer in Pass Christian is testing a new method for growing oysters. It involves raising oyster larvae in large tanks, then transplanting the young oysters onto reefs. The process is called remote setting and it’s proven successful on both the East and West coasts. The big question now is: How will it work in the Mississippi Sound?

Cages filled with oyster shells sit in large tanks at the new Pass Christian Harbor. It could be just what’s needed to jump start the oyster industry here. Read more...


The Norwegian State sells its shares in Cermaq ASA

The Ministry of Trade, Industry and Fisheries has accepted to sell the Norwegian State’s shares in the fish-farming company Cermaq to Mitsubishi Corporation.

The Ministry of Trade, Industry and Fisheries refers to the voluntary offer made by Mitsubishi Corporation, through its subsidiary MC Ocean Holdings Limited, on 22 September 2014 for the purchase of all of the shares in Cermaq ASA at a price of NOK 96 per share. The offer period ends today. Read more...


Tuesday, 21 October 2014

First aquaculture project in federal waters soon

Federal officials say the first shellfish aquaculture project permitted in federal waters off the East Coast is likely to begin in the spring off of Nantucket.

The project is focusing on mussels. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration says scientists and fishermen are partnering on a project to grow blue mussels within a 30-acre area in Nantucket Sound. Read more...